Throwing Lids for Canisters

I’ve been taking up some loose time this week with filling inventories for November. My kiln blew an element last week and now I’m passing time until the replacement part arrives. I’ve been throwing canisters for my local farmers markets.

So… this post is about lids.

I know a lot of potters hate throwing lids, I hear professionals and students alike grump their way through this chore. I’ve been lucky, I’ve really enjoyed developing my approach to throwing this type of lid. It’s taken a few years and a few hundred lids to work out most of the kinks, but the time spent was well worth it.

Throwing Lids
My lids are made with heft, durability, and functionality in mind. They have got to stand up to at least a family’s worth of use. They are truly a functional item that need be well crafted to fit to their companion well. Still, at the same time, I create these with an eye on my personal decorative athletics of strong curvilinear lines, clean tight surfaces juxtaposed with textures, and with a well formed knob on top.
The carved out concave in the center in the bottom of the lid is purely functional, it helps even out the drying of the form, decrease the weight, improve it’s balance, and, well… I like it.

 

Throwing Lids

This is a deceptive shot. I’ll usually throw a series of 7- 15 canisters in a sitting. All of the galleys are made to meet whatever my current predetermined inner diameter is. This is a ritual of studio covenience for me, this way I’m free to explore a body’s form and the lid will essentally fall into place as it moves through the studio. This piece shown is almost 12 hours old. Shrinkage at this scale makes a huge difference… so pay attention to the “wet measurements” of those openings. Take notes and figure out your shrinkage scales of the clays you choose to use, it really pays off.

 

Throwing Lids Throwing Lids Throwing Lids
Let it dry to leather hard before trimming….
Throwing Lids
I throw a fresh trimming chuck to softly hold a green lid and slowly enlarge it as I work though a lid series.
Throwing Lids

This is the finished fit for a lid in a greenware canister. I don’t approve of excessive slop in the play between the lid and galley. When I throw 15 canister bodies I throw 20- 25 lids and mix and match to fit the greenware.

To get a feel for the entire process, check this out.

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“Living Life on the Learning Curve” or “Another Day of Doh!”

All right, so a good part of Monday was spent prepping the kiln, glazing bisque ware, and then came a typical long night of burning expectations while the kiln fires.

Well… I’m often the one who points out that if you aren’t messing stuff up, you aren’t trying hard enough.

Yeah I know, it’s probably not a great catch phrase to run a business by, it is an excellent motto to investigate a process with. Still… it can get pretty frustrating sometimes, but sometimes the results are amazing.
Fetishghost Yunomi
This came out looking like a nice ‘n’ tasty toasty marshmallow.
Fetishghost Blue Yunomi
A scrumptious GhostBlue glaze with fantastic optics trapped in the surface breaking off the rim. The photo series from this shoot doesn’t do this glaze combo justice. This series is gorgeous!
Fetishghost Toasted Yunomi

I love the new GhostMoth stencil. I cut a stack of 32, but I’ve already used up nearly all of em. I live for the small victories!

BUT…
Like I was saying… so with all the success there was still a downside. And of course it was a big one. I had decided to try using shallow trivets with some of the cups to catch any glaze that might roll off the surface. I thought a few cups and their glaze combos might be susceptible to a little running. I had a hunch for a new solution and I needed to try it out.
Fetishghost Process
I was WRONG.
Fetishghost Process Fetishghost Process Detail
The shallow concave of the trivet vitrified it self to the cup at the point of contact…
The edge of the foot then broke nicely away, creating a full set of beautiful 2nds
And so ends my day of “Doh!”

Steam Gear Cup Part 2

Fetishghost Steam Ware

This is the process of applying the newsprint stencils to the surface of a freshly thrown cup that’s still attached to the wheel head. The stencils are adhered to the surface by spritzing the surface of the cup with water and laying the stencil in place. A gentle pressing with a damp sponge sets the stencil in to place.

Fetishghost Steam Ware

A contrasting colored clay slip is then sponged over the entire design. This slip was colored with cobalt oxide, this will fire to a wonderful blue that will influence any glaze that applied over it.

Fetishghost Steam WareNow I can set back an get a feel how the new stencils have worked. I’ll cut a foot on the bottom after it stiffens overnight.